We Are Legion (We Are Bob) Book Review and “You’re Not Good Enough” Book Tag!

We Are Legion (We Are Bob) Book CoverToday’s episode features a review of We Are Legion (We Are Bob) by Dennis E. Taylor. When I first heard about We Are Legion, I wasn’t convinced that I’d like it – mostly because the main character is a spaceship. (That’s kind of an oversimplification, but you’ll understand why after hearing the review.) This book surprised me because it’s not only super fun but also deals with some pretty interesting questions –  like what it means to be alive and the nature of individuality. If that sounds cool, you’re in luck because it’s actually the first of three books in the Bobiverse trilogy. I definitely plan on reading the next two – and I might review them, too!

In the meantime, I decided to shake things up a bit and participate in the “You’re Not Good Enough” book tag. Again, this is going to take some explaining. Basically, I’m going to talk about some interesting / outlandish / funny scenarios and try to figure out which book characters “win” each scenario. Thanks to The Book Cover Girl for tagging me!

Books in this Episode:

  • We Are Legion (We Are Bob) by Dennis E. Taylor
  • It by Stephen King
  • Retrograde by Peter Cawdron
  • Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero
  • Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
  • Their Eyes were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston
  • The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  • Pet Semetary by Stephen King
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
  • The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  • The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
  • The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
  • The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith
  • Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth

For reference, here are the questions from the book tag!

How it Works

Basically, it’s a tag where you pick 30 fictional characters and write their names down on pieces of paper. You then pluck two names at a time out to answer a question – so there are 15 questions. The aim of the game is to pick the character that fits the criteria the best and by doing so find the character that is not “good enough” for the answer.

  1. You only have one more spot on your spelling bee team, who would you pick to complete your team?
  2. Both characters want to kill you, which one would you kill first so you have a better chance of surviving?
  3. You’re on the bachelor/bachelorette and you’re down to these two characters, which one are you going to give your rose too?
  4. You’ve been chosen for the hunger games, who would most likely volunteer in your place?
  5. You’re stranded on an island. Which character would you sacrifice to engage in cannibalism?
  6. You’re the next DC/Marvel superhero (with your own tv show of course), who is your sidekick?
  7. You’re a manager of an avocado admiring company, who would you fire for lack of communication skills?
  8. You’ve just finished a book in which your favorite character dies, which character is most likely to comfort you?
  9. Ugh, it’s high school. Who would most likely be part of the popular clique?
  10. The day has arrived; you’re finally a year older! Who would have the nerve to forget your birthday?
  11. You’ve just found an upcoming booktube star? Who would most likely be?
  12. Sleepover time! Unfortunately, you can only invite one person, who would you invite?
  13. Bam, you’re pregnant. Who’s the father/mother?
  14. You’ve just written a super important text. Who would ‘see’ it, but not reply?
  15. You’ve just woken up and it’s time for breakfast. Your mum’s been replaced by who?!

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The Handmaid’s Tale Review and the Importance of Reaction Scenes

The Handmaid's Tale Book ReviewIn today’s episode, I’m reviewing The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. This book is not only one of Atwood’s most acclaimed novels, but the basis for the American television show by the same name. If you know anything about Margaret Atwood, you know she has a flair for dark, gritty, and utterly captivating dystopian and speculative fiction with a political or feminist slant. Sound intriguing? It is. But in order to get her ideas across effectively, it’s important to have good characters and story structure as well – and that’s exactly what I wanted to explore when I picked up this book.

Additionally, I’m taking a few minutes to talk about the importance of action and reaction scenes in novels. If you’ve ever read a book or watched a show and came away thinking “Wow, I don’t care about those people at all,” it’s possible the story failed to find its action/reaction stride. This not only applies to the individual scenes in your book (how they flow and push the story forward), but it also relates to the relationship between your book’s first and second half.

Books mentioned in this episode:

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero

PS – I also mention “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets,” but I’m talking about the movie, not the French comic book “Empire of a Thousand Planets.”