RE: Amazon Replacing Libraries, Book Haul, & Practical Books on Writing

Let’s talk about that crazy Forbes article that suggested we replace local libraries with Amazon bookstores! Also, I’ve got a first edition book haul to report (Weeee!) and a few suggestions for books about writing that I’ve found practical and think you might too. Most of these books are ones that I use for reference. You don’t really have to read them cover to cover to get the specific information you need. On the other hand, I think it’s valuable to read straight through “how to” books when you have the time because you can find answers to questions you didn’t know you had yet!

Books mentioned in this episode:

  • Deadeye Dick by Kurt Vonnegut
  • The Cat’s Pajamas by Ray Bradbury
  • Obscure Destinies by Willa Cather
  • The History of Love by Nicole Krauss
  • Wordsmithy by Douglas Wilson
  • The Art of Styling Sentences by Ann Longknife and K.D. Sullivan
  • The Fiction Writer’s Guide to Dialogue by John Hugh, Jr
  • The First Five Pages by Noah Lukeman
  • Style: Ten Lessons I Clarity and Grace by Joseph M. Williams
  • A Prayer Journal by Flannery O’Connor
  • Beartown by Fredrik Backman

Plotboilers Presents: “The Count, My Grandmother, and Seeing Through Another’s Eyes” by How to Write Good Podcast!

Today I’m sharing an episode from another podcast, How to Write Good. Why? Because the host of HTWG podcast, Daniel Poppie, was kind enough to invite me onto the show as a guest! I’ve never guested on a show before, so this was a new – and super fun – experience. Join us as we talk about a few recent books I’ve discovered along with their creative implications. You can join the discussion in the comments below or on Twitter at @HTWGPodcast. I also encourage you to subscribe to HTWG podcast on iTunes (or wherever you get your podcasts!); it’s well worth your time if you enjoy writing and/or thinking about the creative process from a fun yet philosophical perspective.

Books mentioned in this episode:

  • My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman
  • The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

 

The Golden Rule of Writing Dialogue

Writing Dialogue

Observation is the writer’s greatest weapon. Sometimes, observations need a little fine-tuning before they wander into your story. Dialogue – the way people talk to each other – is a perfect example of this. Yes, character conversations should flow, but they shouldn’t always read like normal speech. Finding this balance is the first step toward convincing dialogue between characters.

Here’s the first rule of writing dialogue:

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