Carve the Mark Book Review & New Years’ Writing Resolutions

Carve the MarkIn my last episode of 2017, I’ve reviewed Veronica Roth’s “Carve the Mark” and put together some tips and tricks for setting challenging yet achievable writing resolutions for 2018. (If I’m being totally honest, I really don’t like New Years’ resolutions – but improving yourself is always a good thing, right?)

Carve the Mark is, as I forgot to mention on the show, the first in a two-part series. (Duology?) It also hit bookstores in the wake of Roth’s super successful Divergent series. Now that I think about it, I’ve read a few post-break-out novels this year. Aka, books published after an emerging author’s breakout debut. I’m diving into genre, characters, world building and a lot more – so let’s see if Carve the Mark lives up to the fast-paced and fun expectations Divergent set. Happy New Year, bookish friends!

Books mentioned in this episode:

Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth

The Divergent Trilogy by Veronica Roth

The Handmaid’s Tale Review and the Importance of Reaction Scenes

The Handmaid's Tale Book ReviewIn today’s episode, I’m reviewing The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. This book is not only one of Atwood’s most acclaimed novels, but the basis for the American television show by the same name. If you know anything about Margaret Atwood, you know she has a flair for dark, gritty, and utterly captivating dystopian and speculative fiction with a political or feminist slant. Sound intriguing? It is. But in order to get her ideas across effectively, it’s important to have good characters and story structure as well – and that’s exactly what I wanted to explore when I picked up this book.

Additionally, I’m taking a few minutes to talk about the importance of action and reaction scenes in novels. If you’ve ever read a book or watched a show and came away thinking “Wow, I don’t care about those people at all,” it’s possible the story failed to find its action/reaction stride. This not only applies to the individual scenes in your book (how they flow and push the story forward), but it also relates to the relationship between your book’s first and second half.

Books mentioned in this episode:

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero

PS – I also mention “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets,” but I’m talking about the movie, not the French comic book “Empire of a Thousand Planets.”